2018 7th International Conference on Knowledge Discovery

November 24-26, 2018, Hong Kong

Speakers

Keynote Speakers

Prof. Eric Tsui
Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong

Eric Tsui had spent 16 years in industry with Computer Sciences Corporation (CSC) in Australia taking on various capacities including Chief Research Officer and Innovation Manager. During this period, he has made significant contributions to the company’s expert systems products, applied research and innovation programmes.
He joined PolyU in 2005. His speciality areas are Knowledge technologies including Search Engines, Portals, Personal Knowledge Management, Personal Learning Environments, and Knowledge Cloud services.
Professor Tsui is also an honorary advisor of KM and Community of Practice to three Hong Kong government departments. In the past decade, he has supervised or involved in more than 200 KM projects in Hong Kong, Asia and Australia.

In 2014 and 2018, he twice received the Global Knowledge Management Leadership Award, among many other awards on his use of technologies to support Teaching and Learning. He was listed an outstanding and exemplary academic in PolyU's last 2 annual reports.

Since August 2015, he has designed and launched two MOOCs (Massive Open Online Course) -“Knowledge Management and Big Data in Business” and “Industry 4.0: How to revolutionalise your business?” on the MIT edX platform. Together, they have attracted more than 77,000 enrolments and one of them is rated among the Top 7 Business MOOCs worldwide (Source: Canadian Business, April, 2018).

Speech Title:  Challenges and Opportunities in Managing Knowledge in the Age of Digitalisation

Abstract: This talk focusses on increasing digitalisation which lead to the emergence of the networked economy. Though knowledge remains the only infinitelly renewable resource in organisation, the traditional value disciplines pursued by organisations and societies have been constantly challenged. In the networked economy, value is typically created by exchange of data and information leveraging off the network effect. Digitalisdation alone is not a game changer; ting the right mix of digitalisation with knowledge and technologies is. Operating with the above doctrine, the speaker further explores how digitialisation will impact knowledge management together with the associated challenges and opportunities. Data, cloud and people hold the key to success. KM tools and technologies that will play significant roles in the digital transformation journey are accordingly identified, together with industries and organisations that are posed to accomplish quantum improvements upon successful transformations.

 

Prof. Sergei Gorlatch
Universitaet Muenster, Institut fuer Informatik, Germany

Prof. Sergei Gorlatch is an internationally acknowledged expert in the area of algorithms, architectures, software and applications for modern and emerging computer and networked systems. Sergei Gorlatch has been Full Professor of Computer Science at the University of Muenster (Germany) since 2003. Earlier he was Associate Professor at the Technical University of Berlin, Assistant Professor at the University of Passau, and Humboldt Research Fellow at the Technical University of Munich, all in Germany.

Prof. Gorlatch has about 200 peer reviewed publications in renowned international books, journals and conferences. He is often delivering invited talks at international conferences and serves at their program committees. Prof. Gorlatch was principal investigator in several international research and development projects in the field of parallel, distributed, Grid and Cloud algorithms and computing, as well as e-Learning, funded by the European Commission and by German national bodies. Among his recent achievements in the area of data management, communications and future internet is the novel Real-Time Framework (www.real-time-framework.com) developed in his group as a platform for high-level development of real-time, highly interactive applications like multi-player online games, advanced e-Learning, crowd simulations, etc. In the area of high-performance computing, his group has been recently developing a high-level SkelCL library (skelcl.uni-muenster.de/) for efficient programming of parallel algorithms on emerging parallel and distributed many-core systems with accelerators.

Speech Title:  Distributed Applications Based on Mobile Cloud Computing and Software-Defined Networks

Abstract: We consider an emerging class of challenging networked multimedia applications called Real-Time Online Interactive Applications (ROIA). ROIA are networked applications connecting a potentially very high number of users who interact with the application and with each other in real time, i.e., a response to a user’s action happens virtually immediately. Typical representatives of ROIA are multiplayer online computer games, advanced simulation-based e-learning and serious gaming. All these applications are characterized by high performance and QoS requirements, such as: short response times to user inputs (about 0.1-1.5 s); frequent state updates (up to 100 Hz); large and frequently changing numbers of users in a single application instance (up to tens of thousands simultaneous users).

This talk will address two challenging aspects of future Internet-based ROIA applications: a) using Mobile Cloud Computing for allowing high application performance when a ROIA application is accessed from multiple mobile devices, and b) managing dynamic QoS requirements of ROIA applications by employing the emerging technology of Software-Defined Networking (SDN).

 

Prof. Yoshifumi Manabe
Faculty of Informatics, Kogakuin University, Tokyo, Japan

Yoshifumi Manabe was born in 1960. He received his B.E., M.E., and Dr.E. degrees from Osaka University, Osaka, Japan, in 1983, 1985, and 1993, respectively. From 1985 to 2013, he worked for Nippon Telegraph and Telephone Corporation. From 2001 to 2013, he was a guest associate professor of Graduate School of Informatics, Kyoto University. Since 2013, he has been a professor of the Faculty of Informatics, Kogakuin University, Tokyo, Japan. His research interests include distributed algorithms, cryptography, game theory, and graph theory. Dr. Manabe is a member of ACM, IEEE, IEICE, IPSJ, and JSIAM.

Speech Title:  Card-Based Cryptographic Protocols

Abstract: In cryptography, computers are used for encryption and decryption. Card-based cryptographic protocols have been proposed in which physical cards are used instead of computers to securely calculate values. They are useful when computes cannot be used. In addition, people who has no knowledge of cryptography can execute and understand the protocols. den Boer first showed a five card protocol to securely calculate logical AND of two inputs. Since then, many protocols have been proposed to calculate logical functions and specific computations such as millionaires' problem, voting, random permutation, grouping and so on. This talk shows several protocols and recent results using private operations, which are effective primitives to reduce the number of cards used.